Game design – Pink Noam http://pinknoam.com/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 04:58:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://pinknoam.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/default-120x120.png Game design – Pink Noam http://pinknoam.com/ 32 32 Explore game design and development at the Games && Symposium https://pinknoam.com/explore-game-design-and-development-at-the-games-symposium/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 04:58:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/explore-game-design-and-development-at-the-games-symposium/ On Saturday, November 12, five guest speakers spoke on campus about game design and development at Games &&, a symposium hosted by visual arts lecturer Tim Szetela. The symposium was co-sponsored by the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University and the Council on Science and Technology and supported by the John Sacret Young […]]]>

On Saturday, November 12, five guest speakers spoke on campus about game design and development at Games &&, a symposium hosted by visual arts lecturer Tim Szetela.

The symposium was co-sponsored by the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University and the Council on Science and Technology and supported by the John Sacret Young ’69 Lecture Series fund.

Nicole He, a game developer and creative technologist working with the National Film Board of Canada, gave a talk entitled “Making Weird Art In Creative Technology vs. Video Games“.

“My job at Kickstarter was to meet a lot of creative people doing really creative and interesting things,” she said of one of her first jobs in the industry. “I was like, I guess my job is to help these people, but what if I could be these people?”

She showed attendees a short video from a project called “True Love Tinder Robot” and said the video had a significant impact on her career, earning her invitations to festivals and conferences, and later a job. at Google Creative Lab.

“There is something about games that moves people deeply. He has this power. People are willing to suspend disbelief and engage in something for a long time in a way that they are not for almost any other media, and they are willing to pay for it,” he said. -she adds.

The next lecture, titled “Media and Methods for Video Game Urbanism”, was given by Luke Caspar Pearson and Sandra Youkhana, collectively known as You+Pea. They are the co-founders of the Videogame Urbanism studio at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London.

Pearson and Youkhana’s focus on architecture in video games is driven by a desire to break down barriers, they said at the event.

“Architecture is a discipline that is legally protected in many countries,” Pearson said. “Agency of virtual worlds, I think, is a way for us to break down some of these kinds of professional boundaries and we can take advantage of the fact that architects use these technologies a lot in their work anyway.”

Luke Caspar Pearson and Sandra Youkhana talk about London Developers Toolkit ‘2.0’.
Jackie Zhou/The Daily Princetonian

Pearson and Youkhana presented their game titled “London Developers Toolkit ‘2.0’”, a game described on their website as a “‘satirical app’ / renegade startup platform investigating the dawning horizon of phallic residential developments across London”.

“[The game is] talk about a very serious problem facing London as a city,” Pearson said. “There are hundreds of these new buildings. Architectural oversight seems to be quite limited, and they’re not really for people who live in London. They attract outside investment and a lot of these things are never actually occupied.

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After a lunch break at Matthews Acting Studio, Robert Vinluan, Senior Game Designer at The New York Times, opened up about how unconventional the start of his career was.

“I wanted to talk about some sort of game-making process in a place like The New York Times, which is not a place people think makes games,” he said.

“I’m going to take you back to when I first started working on the games team,” he said. “At the time…it was just a crossword and the crossword was an app and a newly digital product.”

According to Vinluan, the Times’ “first big hit” in the games department was Spelling Bee.

Robert Vinluan speaking at the Games && Symposium.
Jackie Zhou/The Daily Princetonian

Afterwards, Salome Asega, director of NEW INC at the New Museum, gave a lecture entitled “Collective Futures”.

Asega discussed his plans at the Iyapo depot.

“This repository is named after Lilith Iyapo, who is sort of a central character in Octavia Butler’s [science fiction series] “Xenogenesis,” she said. “Through what we called the August Wilson Center Lab, we tweaked our workshop curriculum and added three new tracks that allowed time for exposure and hands-on exploration of the tools we use in our studio. .” Asega has focused on one track in particular: digital manufacturing.

Monster truck that looks like a rat made by Salome Asega.
Photo courtesy of Salomé Asega

The final speaker was Mattie Brice, Visiting Assistant Professor at the NYU Game Center, who gave a talk titled “Video Games Didn’t Save Us: A Need for New Design(s)”, emphasizing its vision as a video game developer.

“When we kind of think of games, we think of empowerment, we think of choice, we think of agency, and exploration and agency,” she said. “But I feel like there was something wrong with the way those ideas and tenants and qualities were applied to change the job.”

Brice expanded on the importance of rethinking design goals in video games.

“A common criticism of [social impact games] is it [they] aren’t fun enough for people to learn and build,” she said. “However, the fun really irons out a lot of the nuances and a lot of the action you can do in that space if it’s all going to be fun.”

Audience member Nemo Newman ’23 told the Daily Princetonian, “Seeing how interactive arts can be applied and how people think about it is really interesting, especially as an artistic practice rather than an effort. economical for commercial games. ”

Szetela, the organizer, told ‘The Prince’ that “I think there’s something particularly special about games in their potential to be creative, creative tools of expression somewhat similar to animation. somehow.”

Regarding the choice of speakers, Szetela said, “My goal was to bring a wide variety of perspectives, practices, technologies, types of art and types of design.”

“I think our idea of ​​games is expanding,” he said. “There are a lot of potential connection points in other areas, and I think that’s another area where Princeton in particular could be on the verge of doing some interesting collaborations, thinking about how games could connect to other areas of study.”

The symposium was held on the first floor of 185 Nassau Street, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, November 12.

Jackie Zhou is a news contributor for the “Prince”. Please send all corrections to the corrections on dailyprincetonian.com.


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Meet the game design grad who made the switch to fintech https://pinknoam.com/meet-the-game-design-grad-who-made-the-switch-to-fintech/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:00:43 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/meet-the-game-design-grad-who-made-the-switch-to-fintech/ Benie Mambouana of Fidelity Investments talks about his introduction to the world of fintech and shares some tips for tech graduates. One of the most exciting parts of the tech industry is how entry-level professionals can start on a path to a whole new area they want to explore. That’s what happened to Benie Mambouana, […]]]>

Benie Mambouana of Fidelity Investments talks about his introduction to the world of fintech and shares some tips for tech graduates.

One of the most exciting parts of the tech industry is how entry-level professionals can start on a path to a whole new area they want to explore.

That’s what happened to Benie Mambouana, who did a four-year bachelor’s degree in game design and development at Limerick IT, now part of Shannon University of Technology: Midlands Midwest (TUS). She now works as an associate software engineer at Fidelity Investments.

“I had never heard of fintech until I did a six-month internship at a small fintech start-up in Madrid,” she told SiliconRepublic.com.

“That’s when I realized that I didn’t want to have a career in the gaming industry anymore. I knew that I still wanted to have a career in IT, so I started to focus on the becoming a software engineer. I quickly managed to land a great opportunity with Fidelity Investments. That was my full-loop moment.

Mambouana said she chose the tech industry because of its continuous learning opportunities. “I like change and I get bored easily. It’s the aspect of the industry that appeals to me the most,” she said.

“One of the things that stood out to me the most at Fidelity were the learning days. Fidelity believes in continuous learning and hosts a learning day once a week to give employees the opportunity to develop their skills to advance their careers. »

“In this field, I think it is essential to have an open mind”
– BLESSED MAMBOUANA

With the Fidelity Investments graduate program, are you now working in the type of job you wanted?

Absolutely! One of the amazing things about the Leap Immersive Technology Graduate Program was the weekly meetings I had with my manager to discuss my interests and areas that would interest me.

My manager would keep track of this information to ensure that I was placed in the most appropriate role after completing the program.

I didn’t make it easy for him as I constantly changed my mind as the program progressed. But that’s what the Leap program is for. When you start it, you may have a set career path in mind, which may or may not change after training is complete.

Can you describe a typical day in your role?

At 8:30 a.m. I usually start my day by logging on, checking my email, and looking at my schedule for the day. At 9:30 a.m. my team is using the agile methodology and we have a daily 15 minute scrum meeting to discuss things like what we did the day before, the challenges everyone is facing, and how to possibly overcome those issues.

From 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. I usually write down a list of my tasks for the day and work on my tasks until lunchtime. We work in two-week intervals called sprints. I use the two weeks to complete my tasks and at the end of each sprint we have a sprint planning where I get new tasks from our backlog.

After lunch, my team has a daily catch-up meeting. This allows us to discuss all the obstacles we face in more detail than the Scrum meeting would allow. It also gives us the opportunity to peer review our work.

From 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., I continue to work on my tasks or attend meetings scheduled for the afternoon.

No two days are alike in my role. Sometimes I’m on Zoom calls with my colleagues from the US and other times I might be in the office for a week of Team Connect.

Have your responsibilities and workload changed since you completed the program?

Since completing the Leap program, I’ve taken the skills I learned and started applying them to my role. I also informed my team of my skills after my arrival so that my workload aligned with my skills.

This helped me tremendously because my tasks kept increasing in difficulty based on the new skills I learned. All the members of my team have a more important role than me, so I have the opportunity to learn from them day by day.

Did the graduate program prepare you for professional life?

Besides technical skills, one of the most important skills I improved during the program is how to work well with others.

Since the new normal is now working from home, having good collaboration skills as well as communication skills is essential.

Would you recommend the Fidelity Investments graduate program to others?

This program helped clear up any initial anxiety I had at the start of my career. The industry is so vast and sometimes you can’t help but feel like you’ve been plunged into the deep end when you start a new job.

The Leap program is perfect because you start it with a group of other graduates who are all in the same boat as you. Your spirit is reassured from day one.

I would wholeheartedly recommend the Leap program as I learned a lot and met some great people I can call my friends.

Do you have any advice for future graduates or those just starting out?

If you’re just starting out, try working on a variety of problems. This will help you determine your interests and abilities. In this field, I believe it is essential to have an open mind; what you can enjoy now may change in the future.

Finally, don’t let your pride keep you from learning from others. Otherwise, you will prevent yourself from reaching your full potential.

10 things you need to know straight to your inbox every weekday. Sign up for the brief dailythe summary of essential science and technology news from Silicon Republic.


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TFMA launches new video game design course https://pinknoam.com/tfma-launches-new-video-game-design-course/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:00:44 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/tfma-launches-new-video-game-design-course/ Lab space for TFMA’s new course, Video Games and Playable Media Design, at Klein College of Media and Communication on October 6. ISAAC SCHEIN / NEWS FROM THE TEMPLE In response to the growing demand for video game courses at Temple, the School of Theatre, Film and Media Arts launched an all-new video game design […]]]>
Lab space for TFMA’s new course, Video Games and Playable Media Design, at Klein College of Media and Communication on October 6. ISAAC SCHEIN / NEWS FROM THE TEMPLE

In response to the growing demand for video game courses at Temple, the School of Theatre, Film and Media Arts launched an all-new video game design course this fall.

The class, Video Games and Playable Media Design, is taught by Adjunct Assistant Professor Tom Sharpe and offers a unique approach to the video game design process. The course was created in response to a growing demand for more video game courses at Temple.

Sharpe’s involvement with the course began when he was approached over the summer to teach the course.

“I was approached by Chet Pancake, who’s in the film and media arts department, and they came up to me and said, ‘Hey, we really want to start this video game class, you know, do share your thoughts with me,’ and we started talking at the start of the summer, and then they gave the go-ahead and we just moved on,” Sharpe said.

The course is the premier video game production course offered at Temple and focuses on every step of the video game design process, from character design to narrative writing.

“The Video Game Design and Playable Media course is really unique because it gives an overview of all aspects of video game development, and so what I do is that every week we come in and tackle a discipline completely different,” Sharpe said.

The course focuses on the end-to-end design of an original video game, with each student creating unique character designs, sound effects, and levels.

The structure allows students to feel more invested in the class because while other courses focus more on the individual stages of the video game design process, this class focuses on a large project, said Adrian Gonzalez- Pruna, film and media arts student.

“We are rookies,” Gonzalez-Pruna said. “We’re very new to it, so like we’re all like sponges, we’re ready to learn what we’re learning right in front of us, so we come at it with that feeling of awe.”

The course currently has 10 students, allowing students to receive hands-on attention during class. The hands-on nature and step-by-step method is intended to appeal to students with little experience in the field and allowed students to explore the subject in a novice-friendly environment.

“And the cool thing about this course, and that might change in the future if it gets more popular, but it’s in an environment where it’s not crowded, we only have eight people in our class, eight to 10 people, so he can be really active with you and really help you learn,” Gonzalez-Pruna said.

Sharpe provides students with instruction on the latest video game technologies like Unreal Engine 5, a highly anticipated video game development tool released in April.

Sharpe, who runs Gossamer Games, an independent video game company, is able to bring her professional experience to the classroom as the nature of the course is similar to her job at Gossamer Games.

“So one thing I’m looking forward to is that every week is completely different, and that’s something that kind of reflects a lot of my personal work as well as an independent video game developer, I always jump from discipline to discipline, so I like to come to class every week and take on a new challenge,” said Sharpe.

Although most of his students, who largely major in film and media arts, may not go on to work in that field, Sharpe hopes more students can get involved in the course at the future and that its current students will leave with a better understanding and appreciation for the art of video game design and an ability to take a multidisciplinary creative approach to everything they do, he said.


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Hazelnut Hex Dev Talks Singleplayer Game Design and Navigating Player Comments https://pinknoam.com/hazelnut-hex-dev-talks-singleplayer-game-design-and-navigating-player-comments/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 21:27:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/hazelnut-hex-dev-talks-singleplayer-game-design-and-navigating-player-comments/ In a world of increasingly convoluted AAA titles – filled with branching narratives, side quests and detailed visuals – James, the solo indie developer behind the side-scrolling shooter Hazelnut Hex, think that there are still some who are looking for simpler concepts. This, along with a desire to create games that remind him of his […]]]>

In a world of increasingly convoluted AAA titles – filled with branching narratives, side quests and detailed visuals – James, the solo indie developer behind the side-scrolling shooter Hazelnut Hex, think that there are still some who are looking for simpler concepts. This, along with a desire to create games that remind him of his childhood, drove James to create his first title, which was released in early October.


James, who asked to be referred to only by his first name, began work on Hazelnut four years ago as a passion project, largely alone. Game Rant spoke with James about what he learned during this process and how audiences have received the shmup so far.

GAMER VIDEO OF THE DAY

RELATED: 10 best shmups for newcomers to the genre


Hazelnut Hex and the tests of solo development

James has always had an interest in making video games, but he didn’t think to dabble in the process until he started. Hazelnut Hex. Before that, he worked as a programmer and did independent animation on the side, for example on Adult Swim’s Smiling friends animated series.

“Shortly after leaving my old programming job, I said, ‘Well, I’d still like to do some programming at my own pace,'” James said. He had already created a forward-looking Internet presence in the form of Chunderfins, a name he had previously attached to his work in music and animation. Around 2018, James made Chunderfins his development studio.

When he started building Hazelnuta hellish shmup in the style of classic arcade titles of the genre, James was optimistic about the game’s development schedule. in October 2019.” Hazelnut would not see a release until about three years later.

It turns out that developing a video game on your own is a little more complicated than expected. Something that started as a fun side project quickly turned into his full-time job, James said.

“I had never done game development outside of Flash games when I was in high school. I wasn’t sure what the most time-consuming parts of the process would be.

Although he has a lot of animation experience, it’s the part of development that James says takes the most time. Less complicated enemies in the game took around a full day to draw and animate, but characters with more complex moves and phases took several days. However, James was not completely alone in his work. He had “very talented friends” who helped him with voice acting and Hazelnut cover art.

Hazelnut was entirely self-funded and self-published, which James said was facilitated by the availability of developer tools. “I think creating video games is more accessible today than it’s ever been. I’m working on a computer that’s 10 years old. I don’t ride in it. But the PC development software that I used was very affordable.

RELATED: Announcement of the sequel to Andro Dunos from SHMUP of the 90s

Hazelnut Hex Empty Run

Throughout the development process and in the perspective of Hazelnut release, James had the opportunity to gather valuable feedback on his work. The difficulty was one of the main sticking points, he said.

“The game was probably impossible for anyone but me before playing. Testers told me things like “bosses are downright impossible”.

James’ development goal was to make Hazelnut beaten in 10 lives by his best friend, whom he grew up playing shooting games with. His friend, who was the final tester, ended up finishing the game in just seven years and told him to “make it harder”.

This feedback allowed James to adapt Hazelnut enough gameplay to say it has found the “sweet spot” between difficulty and playability. “I may have overcorrected,” he said. “I heard several people say it was too difficult, but I also heard people say it was too easy.”

Perhaps the most valuable feedback opportunity for Hazelnut was at October’s Vintage Video Game Convention in Colorado, where James had a table. He said it was a particularly unique experience. “I’ve never been to a convention before or had a table like the one I had. I’m not made to stay up for so many hours.

Despite the tribulations of exposure, James said it was exciting to see people of all ages playing and enjoying Hazelnut. The speedrun world record holder for 1993 shmup Gunstar Hero even played the game. “He said the game ‘wasn’t asshole,'” James said, “which is probably one of the best reviews you can get from a speedrunner.”

One of the most striking things James noticed at the Colorado convention was that young people were especially captivated by Hazelnut. It wasn’t something he expected.

“I didn’t know if an old-school shoot ’em up could hold a kid’s attention for even two seconds, but there were a few kids under 10 who sat there for half an hour and who played it all.”

Observe children interact with Hazelnut simpler format made for some sobering observations on the state of the game, James said. “One of the most heartbreaking things I heard at the convention was from a kid who said he liked my game because it never makes you stop watching an ad. It was awful.

Despite this, James said he was happy to see that games like Hazelnut might still appeal to a wider audience. “Kids always appreciate a good shoot ’em up.”

Hazelnut Hex is now available for PC and Switch.

MORE: Hazelnut Hex Dev on How the Game Mirrors Classic Shoot ‘Em Up Titles


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New female-led game design program at Mohawk College to focus on ethics and inclusion https://pinknoam.com/new-female-led-game-design-program-at-mohawk-college-to-focus-on-ethics-and-inclusion/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:29:38 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/new-female-led-game-design-program-at-mohawk-college-to-focus-on-ethics-and-inclusion/ She grew up playing action-adventure video games on the Atari, Commodore 64, and Nintendo DS, and continued into adulthood, using them as a “motivational tool” in research and writing. . But Lisa Funnell said some of the games, particularly a remake of a 1990s Lara Croft game, were “triggered and off-putting”. “The adversary threatened to […]]]>

She grew up playing action-adventure video games on the Atari, Commodore 64, and Nintendo DS, and continued into adulthood, using them as a “motivational tool” in research and writing. .

But Lisa Funnell said some of the games, particularly a remake of a 1990s Lara Croft game, were “triggered and off-putting”.

“The adversary threatened to sexually assault Croft and as a gamer I had to press a series of buttons in a particular order to survive the attack,” said Funnell, associate dean of creative industries at the Mohawk College, to The Spectator in an email.

Funnell failed the first time and saw his character being “brutally murdered on screen”.

“It was so disturbing that I didn’t want to continue playing,” she said. “It made me wonder, who turned on this part of the game?”

Funnell hopes a new Mohawk game design program with an ethical bent will help change the way games are developed.

The program, which will welcome its first cohort next fall, will have “a unique focus on breaking down barriers and creating gaming content that better reflects today’s more diverse and inclusive society,” it reads. in a recent press release.

The three-year Advanced Diploma has been developed in response to a “rapidly growing” industry and will teach the design, technical and artistic skills involved in game production, as well as ethics in game content and location. of work.

“Design thinking requires an empathetic understanding of people, challenges assumptions, focuses on experimentation and testing, and is strongly action-oriented,” Funnell said. “It’s important that we help nurture the next generation of ethical and inclusive creators.”

Funnell, who researches gender and geopolitics in film, particularly James Bond, said she “initiated the redesign of the program using an EDI (equity, diversity and inclusion) lens” when she started as Associate Dean in May.

“Too often, sexual violence is used problematically to portray female vulnerability and emerging heroic strength in the media,” Funnell said.

Angela Stukator, a special advisor who co-leads the program’s development, said the program aims to be a leader in the industry.

“We don’t want to mirror the industry, we want to model another industry approach, an inclusive approach,” said Stukator, who has about four decades of post-secondary education experience.

Mohawk says the program’s leadership team is made up largely of female academics, noting the “leading role women can play within the industry.”

“We are at a point in our cultural history where we recognize that this has to be a priority,” Stukator said.


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New female-led game design program at Mohawk College to focus on ethics and inclusion https://pinknoam.com/new-female-led-game-design-program-at-mohawk-college-to-focus-on-ethics-and-inclusion-2/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/new-female-led-game-design-program-at-mohawk-college-to-focus-on-ethics-and-inclusion-2/ She grew up playing action-adventure video games on the Atari, Commodore 64, and Nintendo DS, and continued into adulthood, using them as a “motivational tool” in research and writing. . But Lisa Funnell said some of the games, particularly a remake of a 1990s Lara Croft game, were “triggered and off-putting”. “The adversary threatened to […]]]>

She grew up playing action-adventure video games on the Atari, Commodore 64, and Nintendo DS, and continued into adulthood, using them as a “motivational tool” in research and writing. .

But Lisa Funnell said some of the games, particularly a remake of a 1990s Lara Croft game, were “triggered and off-putting”.

“The adversary threatened to sexually assault Croft and as a gamer I had to press a series of buttons in a particular order to survive the attack,” said Funnell, associate dean of creative industries at the Mohawk College, to The Spectator in an email.

Funnell failed the first time and saw his character being “brutally murdered on screen”.

“It was so disturbing that I didn’t want to continue playing,” she said. “It made me wonder, who turned on this part of the game?”

Funnell hopes a new Mohawk game design program with an ethical bent will help change the way games are developed.

The program, which will welcome its first cohort next fall, will have “a unique focus on breaking down barriers and creating gaming content that better reflects today’s more diverse and inclusive society,” it reads. in a recent press release.

The three-year Advanced Diploma has been developed in response to a “rapidly growing” industry and will teach the design, technical and artistic skills involved in game production, as well as ethics in game content and venue. work.

“Design thinking requires an empathetic understanding of people, challenges assumptions, focuses on experimentation and testing, and is strongly action-oriented,” Funnell said. “It’s important that we help nurture the next generation of ethical and inclusive creators.”

Funnell, who researches gender and geopolitics in film, particularly James Bond, said she “initiated the redesign of the program using an EDI (equity, diversity and inclusion) lens” when she started as Associate Dean in May.

“Too often, sexual violence is used problematically to portray female vulnerability and emerging heroic strength in the media,” Funnell said.

Angela Stukator, a special advisor who co-leads the program’s development, said the program aims to be a leader in the industry.

“We don’t want to mirror the industry, we want to model another industry approach, an inclusive approach,” said Stukator, who has about four decades of post-secondary education experience.

Mohawk says the program’s leadership team is made up largely of female academics, noting the “leading role women can play within the industry.”

“We are at a point in our cultural history where we recognize that this has to be a priority,” Stukator said.


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NFT game design is hard 👾 https://pinknoam.com/nft-game-design-is-hard-%f0%9f%91%be/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:34:36 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/nft-game-design-is-hard-%f0%9f%91%be/ The metaverse is a Newsletter without bank for weekly updates on NFTs, virtual worlds and collectibles Dear nation without a bank, There’s an awful lot of construction happening around the NFT gaming scene right now. But work? This is hard. This is because designing a regular game is quite difficult as it is. When you […]]]>

The metaverse is a Newsletter without bank for weekly updates on NFTs, virtual worlds and collectibles

Dear nation without a bank,

There’s an awful lot of construction happening around the NFT gaming scene right now.

But work? This is hard.

This is because designing a regular game is quite difficult as it is. When you add NFTs to the mix, certain challenges can arise that can hurt a game more than help it.

So what is there to do and what should we expect regarding NFT games in the future? I offer some thoughts on these questions for today’s post!

-WMP

🙏 Sponsor: Upgrade to Bankless Premium to receive the new Monthly Token Report! ✨

NFT games can come in all sorts of different shapes and sizes.

At the simpler end of the spectrum, they can be simple chain strategy games.

On the other side of the spectrum, these can be advanced and expansive massively multiplayer online (MMO) projects that use NFT resources to track player ownership beyond centralized servers.

So far, we’ve seen a lot of experiments on the simpler side of things. I recently played in one, andy8052’s Chain Battle Royale. Very simple but interesting nonetheless!

What we do not have many seen to date are the most extensive NFT-enabled MMO projects. To be fair, there is many such projects in development right now, and I’m excited about some of them.

On the other hand, it’s no surprise that the full title NFT gaming industry is still gaining a foothold: game design is incredibly difficult!

Of battle animations to level designs gambling economical faucets and sinksclassic game design has a tonne of moving parts that are already complicated in tandem as it is. So when you have plans, casually throw NFTs into the equation and over-tokenize their strengths in the game, they only add to the complexity and challenges they face.

Indeed, if executed poorly, NFTs can be game killers. So noted 0xKepler in a July 2022 article titled “A Way Forward for Web3 Gameswhere the author highlighted how games that “have tokenized the majority of their in-game assets” ultimately faced two huge challenges: leaving the economy and excessive speculation.

When it comes to exits from the economy, if everything is tokenized, winning becomes the main goal for players, which can lead to everyone cashing out simultaneously with little or no interest on the demand side, i.e. say an economic collapse. 0xKepler wrote:

In the absence of anyone on the demand side of currencies and assets who see value in them other than money, prices plummet, which translates into lower revenue for players. The game becomes uninteresting – existing players leave and new players are less likely to join. P2E games often relied too heavily on player growth rather than recurring token sinks, which led to a rapid drop in economies..”

And about to speculate wildly, 0xKepler used the auction house system episode in Diablo 3 to show how everything easily negotiable can drive out real players and kill game economies:

Easily tradable assets take away the sense of accomplishment that some players crave. Therefore, games with in-game markets reach fewer such players (who are often value additions to the economy) and are more likely to onboard players attracted by monetary rewards (usually value extractors ). Over time, speculators drive up prices, making the assets needed to play the game unaffordable for non-speculative players. In the end, only the speculators are left.”

When it comes to “what makes a good NFT game”, we have to go back to the fundamentals of the games period. And for that, we need to understand why people play games in the first place, which I think Sal.xyz described perfectly in the tweets above: for test our skillshave unique independent experiencesand to connect with others.

With these pillars in mind, it are ways to create smarter NFT games to optimize these fundamentals and mitigate the challenges of economic exits and over-speculation. Here, the aforementioned 0xKepler recommends the following principles:

The transaction tax is a huge sink/stabilizer of the Eve Online economy, the oldest virtual economy in existence – via 0xKepler
Via 0xKepler
  • NFT > Fungible Tokens (FT)By focusing on NFT rewards instead of FT rewards, a game can emphasize in-game fun and usefulness rather than financialization

  • Land value taxPrevent NFT land from becoming too valuable and over-speculated by using a metaverse land tax (which I have already written about!) to optimize for builders that promote sustainable savings

When implemented well, NFTs can lead to new types of gaming experiences.

For example, consider the personalization and community empowerment that comes with openness. Let’s say you have a team building the core of a chain game as hyperstructure, which are free to use and build forever. It could unleash the power of modding communities like never before.

Beyond the literal openness, there is also a window of opportunity for web3-native game projects that are ahead of web3 compared to major game publishers. We should use this period of ignorance to set the tone for what great NFT games can and should be.

Finally, one of the coolest aspects of NFT games is how they can serve as a medium for players’ achievements to travel with them through different games and beyond. Currently, in mainstream games, your game data is siloed in each respective game, which closes tons of possibilities.

As an example, an upcoming NFT game that I can tell does an interesting job of balancing the challenges and opportunities I’ve outlined above is Civitas.

Due next year, Civitas is a strategy MMO built on Ethereum + L2 that will be vaguely familiar to anyone who’s ever played the game. Sid Meier’s Civilization previously franchised. The big difference in Civitas is that each of its cities are sub-DAOs that are collaboratively owned and organized by citizen actors.

Mechanics as a Free Nomad mode to a CITI token transaction tax on resource exchanges, Civitas has various elements that I believe can stabilize against over-speculation while creating a vibrant game economy. Only time will tell for now!

What’s next for NFT games?

A low hanging fruit is that there will continue to be a boom in game development efforts on and around layer two (L2) scaling solutions. With fast and very inexpensive transactions, these L2s represent the next onchain “frontier” for better web3 gaming.

Finally, there’s a ton of fragmentation in the NFT gaming ecosystem right now, i.e. there are tons of different projects built in an essentially siled fashion on dozens of blockchains that do not “talk” to each other. That said, we must look in the longer term to see more interoperability solutions appear to make these fragmentation fractures more insignificant.

William M. Peaster is a professional writer and creator of Metaverse—a Bankless newsletter focused on the emergence of NFTs in the cryptoeconomy. He has also recently contributed content to Bankless, JPG and beyond!

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No financial or tax advice. This newsletter is strictly educational and does not constitute investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell assets or to make financial decisions. This newsletter is not tax advice. Talk to your accountant. Do your own research.

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Here’s why Marvel Snap’s game design is so ingenious https://pinknoam.com/heres-why-marvel-snaps-game-design-is-so-ingenious/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/heres-why-marvel-snaps-game-design-is-so-ingenious/ I’ve already mentioned my struggles researching a new mobile game, and it seems the Second Dinner team has heard my prayers. marvel snapwhich launched this week on iOS, Android, and Steam, is a fun and “catchy” collectible card game that scratched the “play on the bus” itch I’ve been craving. Developers who have played Blizzard […]]]>

I’ve already mentioned my struggles researching a new mobile game, and it seems the Second Dinner team has heard my prayers. marvel snapwhich launched this week on iOS, Android, and Steam, is a fun and “catchy” collectible card game that scratched the “play on the bus” itch I’ve been craving.

Developers who have played Blizzard Entertainment Foyer will recognize many of the game’s design principles in this Marvel-themed free game. Cards crash onto the board with a satisfying “crunch”, there’s a tiered energy system that builds tension as the game progresses, and there’s a good amount of CCG synergy which encourages players to experiment with niche heroes and villains from Marvel history.

After assembling a deck, players compete in showdowns where they don’t try to destroy each other’s heroes, but rather control at least two of the three lanes (called “Locations” in marvel snap). Slots also contain bonus powers that can either benefit both players or reward the player controlling the slot.

This design gives the game a nice narrative setting (the player is not a superhero himself, but rather a superhero team leader sending his favorite characters into battle), but there is a more mechanic subtle in play that brings the whole experience together: players take turns playing simultaneouslyrather than one at a time.

Why is it so exciting? It’s game theory time.

marvel snapSimultaneous spins make games short and enjoyable

Okay, actually, we need to put a button in game theory. First, let’s do some math.

Second Dinner was founded by formerFoyer developers like Ben Brode, and in their previous game, matches could go on for a long time.

Transforms Foyer max in 75 seconds, and player-collected data shows us that in February 2022, the average game lasts about nine rounds.

Whether Foyer players make quick decisions (say they take 15 seconds per turn), you might have turns that last 30 seconds, or an average game of 270 seconds. Games like this will only last about four minutes and 30 seconds.

But what if players use their full 75 seconds every turn? This sometimes happens for organic (players are in touch and willing to think things through) and inorganic (players are trolls) reasons. A 9 rounds Foyer the game could then run as long as 22 minutes and 30 seconds.

The purple button in the lower right also serves as a timer.

It doesn’t happen often, but I’m sure some Foyer the games I played around 2014-2015 were at least 15-20 minutes long. Sometimes they looked like big tough duels; other times I was run over by trolls.

There’s an obvious multiplication issue here that makes the potential match length so long: the length of each round is determined by the combined time each player spends on their hand. If one player is rushing and the other is acting slow, one of them might get irritated by the other’s pace.

In marvel snapplayers select their cards in the same turn which caps out at 35-40 seconds (I was trying to juggle a timer and play a card, it wasn’t accurate).

With games locked at six rounds (less than Foyeropen average of nine), each match has a fixed maximum duration: approximately three to four minutes.

Right away you can see the difference: marvel snap rounds are short and fit very easily into someone’s lunch window, bus ride or commercial break. But the length of the trick is not enough to guarantee the enjoyment or the interest of the player. What do simultaneous spins do to make the game so engrossing?

Now is the time for game theory

All turn-based multiplayer games rely on some level of projection or patience for what your opponent is going to do. What marvel snap illustrates is that there’s a huge difference in how you try to make those guesses when you and your opponent are playing your cards at the same time.

In Foyer (or Yu-Gi-Oh, Magic the Gathering, the Pokémon Trading Card Game), players take turns and can make assessments based on the choices their opponent makes in an isolated environment.

There is still strength in this kind of design! When games are structured with individual rounds, CCG players begin to learn the same skills as poker players. They look for clues, observe how their opponent reacts to their own decisions, and observe the minute choices that can define a player’s turn.

But when players play their cards at the same time, the only information each of them has are the cards that were played the previous turn (especially true in a digital environment. Second Dinner also does not rely on cursor arrows that appeared in Foyer).

There is a lot of information in these maps. And with marvel snapIn the three-slot structure of , players are also asked to guess not only what types of cards their opponent will play, but where they will play them. The early cards in the games starter deck actively encourage new players to start making that judgment, and it’s a call that’s easier or harder to make depending on what’s been played.

For example, the starting Hawk’s Eye card gains more power if its owner plays another card in the same Location on the next turn. If I see my opponent playing Hawkeye, I know I can safely play a card like Star Lord, which gains power if my opponent plays a card in the same location in the same turn.

But what if my opponent is willing to give up Hawkeye’s bonus power in a digital head fake? What if their strategy was based on another card that could act alone in another place? What if the place where we place our cards turns out to have a secret power that overrides someone’s strategy? These choices are all amplified by marvel snapis the simultaneous game.

You can find examples of this type of design all over the world of board games, and it has already influenced video games through games like Teamfight Tactics Where Automatic failures. But Second Dinner’s introduction of the mechanic to the CCG’s digital marketplace brings freshness to the genre.

This mechanic also feels like it does more for user retention than other gadgets in use right now. Do players really want to own digital cards? Or are they more interested in fast rounds that tickle their brains and give them a dopamine hit?*

It could be both! Maybe there’s a peanut butter and jelly sandwich of a game waiting to happen. But for now, I want to commend the Second Dinner team for preparing something so fresh in a crowded market. It’s not just the Marvel brand that makes this game so compelling, it’s a good set of design and programming principles that should inspire other developers.

*Yeah yeah, we can’t get out of here without acknowledging the sometimes dodgy ethics of dopamine shots in video games. The always excellent Celia Hodent has talked at length about that matter.

Update: This story previously misspelled the name of Second Dinner co-founder Ben Brode. It has been updated to correct the error.



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Darktide’s hybrid combat has a satisfying hook that forces players to adapt https://pinknoam.com/darktides-hybrid-combat-has-a-satisfying-hook-that-forces-players-to-adapt/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 21:15:30 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/darktides-hybrid-combat-has-a-satisfying-hook-that-forces-players-to-adapt/ Welcome to the 11th installment of the Game Design Spotlight, a weekly piece where I examine design elements of multiplayer titles, such as in-game color filter presets that make gameplay beautiful, and immersive quest design. Last week we looked at the chaotic use of the Battlecry by players in Chivalry 2 and its savory importance […]]]>

Welcome to the 11th installment of the Game Design Spotlight, a weekly piece where I examine design elements of multiplayer titles, such as in-game color filter presets that make gameplay beautiful, and immersive quest design. Last week we looked at the chaotic use of the Battlecry by players in Chivalry 2 and its savory importance to the game. Today I walk us through Warhammer 40K: Darktide’s hybrid combat and its insane execution. during last weekend’s beta test.

“Vermintide with guns” is what I thought Warhammer 40k: Darktide would be when it was announced at Summer Game Fest 2022. Developer Fatshark even spoke at length about the comparison in a blog post and how their focus on overcoming that notion would be a difficult challenge without a reference point.

After playing Darktide in the first large-scale beta test last weekend, I firmly I believe hybrid combat replaces that misconception that Vermintide players might have. Switching between melee, ranged, and items/abilities felt nice with the Vermintide model of multiplayer missions and is a fulfilling cycle; filled with horde-infested combat situations that brutally force players to adapt as necessary to better Where worse.

Beat you to a bloody pulp

As someone outside of the Warhammer 40K fanbase, I can’t speak to the precise implementation of Fatshark, but Darktide was visually stunning in its granularity. The locations inside the hive city of Tertium were grimly oppressive, with seemingly dangerous machinery and crumbling architecture naturally giving players the feeling that dangers lurk everywhere. And oh man they or they do.

Darktide Weekend Beta Test

You’ll hear the hurrying bare feet of zombie-like opponents swarming towards you in the next room, you’ll be ambushed as you turn corners and open doors, and experience an unsuspecting bomb rush by meaty goliaths and muscles that will ragdoll you across the arena. The safest place is always next to your teammates with your paltry gear, but hiccups will occur, leading to you getting beaten to bloody mush and peeled off the ground for the umpteenth time by one of your comrades.

The beta test difficulty seemed fair, though. Carelessly burning my ammo like Darktide endlessly throwing it in my direction created problems when dealing with pesky ranged enemies, and crazy threats in your face overwhelmed me if I didn’t use my melee weapon. Finally, I noted that hybrid combat inspires players to reflect on its chaos due to how easily you can get in a hole.

A hole where you feel like a one person army because you picked up Zealot: Preacher and let your character wear you down with his epic quotes (okay, that strength just be me). The thing is, Fatshark wants you to feel back against the wall all on your own, and teaming up is essential. This methodology is crystal clear when you look at the type of game that Darktide is, but it’s easy to get overwhelmed if not everyone is on the same page.

Empower players

The same feeling of teamwork is equally present when optimizing your weapon kit, inspiring you to find ways to use them as a team for various situations. A mix of enemy types, the type of mission you signed up for, and the group of classes you lead with contribute massively to the rotation players will settle into when swapping weapons.

Darktide Gamescom Trailer

I found that partying with Veteran: Snipers made me feel comfortable saving my ammo for when it was empty, as they are ranged combat specialists. Shielded enemies had me maneuvering through mobs of enemies with my weapon and ax to reach their weak points. The separate objectives during the mission, whether it was holding a location or dealing with a mini-boss, always kept me on my toes as Darktide kept my team in enclosed spaces or large areas where the crowds flocked.

Moment-to-moment gameplay naturally empowers the player as you master it, but will consistently hit you when you make the wrong call. Adapting to the nature of a strike force, Darktide really sells the vibe of venturing into the depths of a gruesome mechanical dredge to fish your target, and any wrong or right move can alter mission success. . For me it’s like a sacred great cycle.

A great loop

Darktide isn’t mindless fun – in my eyes – but rather a progressively fun title that gets better as you understand its nuances. Sure, that’s just from my perspective after playing the beta, but the wheel it has running requires more brainpower than slashing or downing enemies. Game verbs accessible to players are like a tool belt – albeit with fewer holding slots, but equipped with tools that shine better with how players use them.

Warhammer Darktide Delay

Fatshark’s implementation of Darktide’s hybrid combat stays true to co-op experiences and feels layered with a terrific loop with many roles/choices at play. It’s fun, freaky, overwhelming, and hard to master, but in the together it fills the excitement of getting back into the fray to try again and improve with your teammates.

This wraps up another week of Game Design Spotlight! Did you get to test hybrid combat in Darktide last weekend? If so, which elements did you like best and do you have any comments for the developers? Let us know below! Also feel free to comment on any games or features you’d like me to cover for future stories if you have any suggestions!


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Darktide’s hybrid combat has a satisfying hook that forces players to adapt https://pinknoam.com/darktides-hybrid-combat-has-a-satisfying-hook-that-forces-players-to-adapt-2/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 21:15:30 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/darktides-hybrid-combat-has-a-satisfying-hook-that-forces-players-to-adapt-2/ Welcome to the 11th installment of the Game Design Spotlight, a weekly piece where I examine design elements of multiplayer titles, such as in-game color filter presets that make gameplay beautiful, and immersive quest design. Last week we looked at the chaotic use of the Battlecry by players in Chivalry 2 and its savory importance […]]]>

Welcome to the 11th installment of the Game Design Spotlight, a weekly piece where I examine design elements of multiplayer titles, such as in-game color filter presets that make gameplay beautiful, and immersive quest design. Last week we looked at the chaotic use of the Battlecry by players in Chivalry 2 and its savory importance to the game. Today I walk us through Warhammer 40K: Darktide’s hybrid combat and its insane execution. during last weekend’s beta test.

“Vermintide with guns” is what I thought Warhammer 40k: Darktide would be when it was announced at Summer Game Fest 2022. Developer Fatshark even spoke at length about the comparison in a blog post and how their focus on overcoming that notion would be a difficult challenge without a reference point.

After playing Darktide in the first large-scale beta test last weekend, I firmly I believe hybrid combat replaces that misconception that Vermintide players might have. Switching between melee, ranged, and items/abilities felt nice with the Vermintide model of multiplayer missions and is a fulfilling cycle; filled with horde-infested combat situations that brutally force players to adapt as necessary to better Where worse.

Beat you to a bloody pulp

As someone outside of the Warhammer 40K fanbase, I can’t speak to the precise implementation of Fatshark, but Darktide was visually stunning in its granularity. The locations inside the hive city of Tertium were grimly oppressive, with seemingly dangerous machinery and crumbling architecture naturally giving players the feeling that dangers lurk everywhere. And oh man they or they do.

Darktide Weekend Beta Test

You’ll hear the hurrying bare feet of zombie-like opponents swarming towards you in the next room, you’ll be ambushed as you turn corners and open doors, and experience an unsuspecting bomb rush by meaty goliaths and muscles that will ragdoll you across the arena. The safest place is always next to your teammates with your paltry gear, but hiccups will occur, leading to you getting beaten to bloody mush and peeled off the ground for the umpteenth time by one of your comrades.

The beta test difficulty seemed fair, though. Carelessly burning my ammo like Darktide endlessly throwing it in my direction created problems when dealing with pesky ranged enemies, and crazy threats in your face overwhelmed me if I didn’t use my melee weapon. Finally, I noted that hybrid combat inspires players to reflect on its chaos due to how easily you can get in a hole.

A hole where you feel like a one person army because you picked up Zealot: Preacher and let your character wear you down with his epic quotes (okay, that strength just be me). The thing is, Fatshark wants you to feel back against the wall all on your own, and teaming up is key. This methodology is crystal clear when you look at the type of game that Darktide is, but it’s easy to get overwhelmed if not everyone is on the same page.

Empower players

The same feeling of teamwork is equally present when optimizing your weapon kit, inspiring you to find ways to use them as a team for various situations. A mix of enemy types, the type of mission you signed up for, and the group of classes you lead with contribute massively to the rotation players will settle into when swapping weapons.

Darktide Gamescom Trailer

I found partying with Veteran: Snipers made me feel good about saving my ammo for when they ran out because they are ranged combat specialists. Shielded enemies had me maneuvering through mobs of enemies with my weapon and ax to reach their weak spots. The separate objectives during the mission, whether it was holding a location or dealing with a mini-boss, always kept me on my toes as Darktide kept my team in enclosed spaces or large areas where the crowds flocked.

Moment-to-moment gameplay naturally empowers the player as you master it, but will consistently hit you when you make the wrong call. Adapting to the nature of a strike force, Darktide really sells the vibe of venturing into the depths of a gruesome mechanical dredge to fish your target, and any wrong or right move can alter mission success. . For me it’s like a sacred great cycle.

A great loop

Darktide isn’t mindless fun – in my eyes – but rather a progressively fun title that gets better as you understand its nuances. Sure, that’s just from my perspective after playing the beta, but the wheel it has running requires more brainpower than slashing or downing enemies. Game verbs accessible to players are like a tool belt – albeit with fewer holding slots, but equipped with tools that shine better with how players use them.

Warhammer Darktide Delay

Fatshark’s implementation of Darktide’s hybrid combat stays true to co-op experiences and feels layered with a terrific loop with many roles/choices at play. It’s fun, freaky, overwhelming, and hard to master, but in the together it fills the excitement of getting back into the fray to try again and improve with your teammates.

This wraps up another week of Game Design Spotlight! Did you get to test hybrid combat in Darktide last weekend? If so, which elements did you like best and do you have any comments for the developers? Let us know below! Also feel free to comment on any games or features you’d like me to cover for future stories if you have any suggestions!


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