Game design – Pink Noam http://pinknoam.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 14:06:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://pinknoam.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/default-120x120.png Game design – Pink Noam http://pinknoam.com/ 32 32 Game Design Bootcamp: Everything you need to know before signing up https://pinknoam.com/game-design-bootcamp-everything-you-need-to-know-before-signing-up/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 14:06:59 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/game-design-bootcamp-everything-you-need-to-know-before-signing-up/ JThe gaming industry has exploded with growth over the past decade. As a result, game development companies are constantly looking for ways to grow their talent pool with game designers and developers. Many employers turn to game design bootcamps to fill essential roles within their teams, which include designers, programmers, and developers. The following sections […]]]>

JThe gaming industry has exploded with growth over the past decade. As a result, game development companies are constantly looking for ways to grow their talent pool with game designers and developers.

Many employers turn to game design bootcamps to fill essential roles within their teams, which include designers, programmers, and developers.

The following sections provide an overview of how these game design bootcamps work and the types of opportunities they provide for graduates.

What is a game design bootcamp?

Game design bootcamps teach students the tools and techniques they will need to succeed in the video game industry. Since the gaming industry involves various elements, every bootcamp is slightly different.

For example, some of these interactive short programs focus on the creative components of game design, such as illustration, animation, and storytelling. Other bootcamps focus on the technical aspects, focusing on the actual programming and coding of the game.

What jobs are available for Game Design Bootcamp graduates?

After graduating, most students land positions at gaming companies within six months. The tasks of video game design professionals vary by organization, location, and other factors.

Generally, there are three types of positions available for game design bootcamp graduates: video game designer, video game programmer, and video game quality assurance tester. Each focuses on different aspects of video game production, but all provide the experience needed to build a successful career in the video game industry.

Who Should Attend a Game Design Bootcamp

Game design bootcamps teach real-world skills and techniques, and most don’t require students to have previous experience or education. Completing one of these bootcamps might be a bit more difficult if you don’t know coding languages ​​like C++ or Java, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible.

Many people use game design bootcamps to transition from their current industries into the gaming industry. If you are passionate about game design and see yourself working for a game development company, there is a bootcamp for you.

How much does a game design bootcamp cost?

Overall, game design bootcamps are more affordable than traditional bachelor’s degrees in computer science and similar fields. Most bootcamps cost between $500 and $15,000. That’s far less than the $37,400 average undergraduates spend on four years of college tuition and fees.

If you’re considering a game design bootcamp but are hesitant to spend a large amount of money, ask your potential program about scholarships and payment plans. Many bootcamps allow students to pay their tuition in installments to help make the total cost of the program more affordable.

How to enroll in a game design bootcamp

Enrolling in a game design bootcamp is easy because most don’t involve any prerequisite courses or experience. The hardest part of signing up is selecting a bootcamp and how you want to learn. To help you decide which program is right for you, we’ve created a list of questions you should consider before applying.

Important Questions to Consider Before Enrolling in a Game Design Bootcamp

  • How long of a program do you want to attend?
  • Do you want to participate in a part-time or full-time bootcamp?
  • Do you have a preference regarding the area of ​​game design you want to study? (for example, design, programming or quality assurance)
  • Who are the instructors who give the lessons?
  • Does the bootcamp have a strong alumni network?
  • Are the latest bootcamp graduates currently working in the field?

Once you’ve decided on the type and length of game design bootcamp you want to attend, it’s time to start applying.

Most bootcamps require applicants to complete an online application and provide some personal information. After submitting an application, a bootcamp representative should contact you to discuss your interest. The final step is to complete all final paperwork and prepare for the first day of class.

What a game design bootcamp teaches you

Unlike traditional college courses that focus on the theory behind game development, game design bootcamps emphasize real-world skills and applications. Bootcamp students learn everything from software development and programming languages ​​to game design and architecture.

Below, we take a closer look at the elements of game design you can expect to learn from a bootcamp.

Software development

Throughout a game design bootcamp, you’ll learn about many elements of the game design process, including software development. Students explore the various systems used to create games and learn about popular industry tools. Here are some of the platforms you could use during your bootcamp:

  • Nuclino
  • Unity
  • Adobe XD
  • GameMakerStudio
  • Unreal Engine
  • Maya
  • 3D Studio Max

Programming languages

Coding is another important skill that game design bootcamps teach. Coding languages ​​like Java and Python are important to understand, but most bootcamps focus on C# and C++ first, as these languages ​​are the building blocks of most games.

Design skills

For students who want to learn more about the design side of game development, a bootcamp can be a great way to learn. Some game design bootcamps teach animation skills such as keyframes, character interaction, and choreography sequences.

Depending on your level of involvement in character development, you can look for a bootcamp that teaches students how to draw and produce wireframes throughout the character building process.

Soft skills

Although many bootcamps don’t directly teach soft skills, bootcamp students still learn how to communicate well with others. In addition to improving your communication skills, you can become a better multitasking and critical thinker by attending a bootcamp.

Frequently Asked Questions About Game Design Bootcamps

Will a game design bootcamp help me land a job?

Yes, although there are no guarantees, a game design bootcamp can help you land a job. Many companies hold game design bootcamps in high regard because bootcamp programs are typically intensive and focus on the fundamental skills that game designers need.

Is a game design bootcamp worth it?

Yes, especially if you want to transition into the game design industry. Bootcamps provide hands-on experience and teach real-world skills in just a few months, making them a great alternative to longer, more expensive traditional degrees.

Does game design require coding?

Coding can be useful throughout your game design career, but it’s not essential to landing a job. Many game design roles focus on art, creative writing, or user experience and don’t require knowledge of programming languages ​​like C++ and Java.

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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Wigston Game Design Students to Compete in British Esports Student Champs Final https://pinknoam.com/wigston-game-design-students-to-compete-in-british-esports-student-champs-final/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 13:10:24 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/wigston-game-design-students-to-compete-in-british-esports-student-champs-final/ Pictured above: NWSLC’s “The Eagles” Submitted by NWSLC Three game design students from Wigston will take part in the British Esports Student Champs final in July in Nottingham. On July 2 and 3, George Hayward, Johnathan Martin and Jacob Wright, whose team is called “The Eagles”, will compete in the Rocket League Finals at the […]]]>

Pictured above: NWSLC’s “The Eagles”

Submitted by NWSLC

Three game design students from Wigston will take part in the British Esports Student Champs final in July in Nottingham.

On July 2 and 3, George Hayward, Johnathan Martin and Jacob Wright, whose team is called “The Eagles”, will compete in the Rocket League Finals at the Confetti Institute of Creative Technologies.

Students will test their video game skills live on Twitch, with more than 700 teams and 3,000 players competing in the championships, making NWSLC students three of 20 finalists, competing against Halesowen College.

James Tedder is a lecturer in game design at the NWSLC and has competed in UK esports competitions in recent years.

James said: “We are seeing more interest than ever in our degree programs in esports, game design and digital technologies.

“Esports is a growing industry with plenty of career opportunities. To work in this industry, you need fantastic communication and media skills and the ability to edit video, create graphics, manage events and run a business.

“NWSLC students learn how to comment and analyze gameplay and use our superb facilities, including a VR vehicle cockpit and the latest computer technology for gaming platforms.

“Students are also honing their skills in competitive gaming as part of the college’s various custom leagues in addition to the UK national esports competition. These include game genres like real-time strategy, combat and games. sports.”

The Student Champs, a series of competitive grassroots video game tournaments, have been designed by British Esports for students aged 12 and over in secondary schools and colleges across the UK.

The team-based extracurricular activity helps motivate and inspire students to pursue their studies.

This year’s competition saw teams compete in various games, including Overwatch, League of Legends, Rocket League, and VALORANT.

Two of the college teams reached the semi-finals, held in March 2022, with the monkey team competing in the League of Legends game.

The Eagles managed to fend off the Edinburgh College team to reach the final.

Marion Plant, OBE FCGI, Director and Chief Executive of the NWSLC, said: “Congratulations to our students who have done so well to reach the final of this high-level skills competition.

“Digital technology is one of our areas of specialization at college, and the number of course options is growing every year.

“According to the 2021 Tech Nation report, UK investment in technology is up 17% year-on-year, and its value to the economy has increased significantly.

“These market conditions provide exciting employment opportunities for our students, and we are well placed to ensure they are able to take advantage of career paths in this sector.

“We wish the Eagles team good luck for the final.”


Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more from Wigston, dedicated to Leicestershire InYourArea Feed.



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The story behind studying game design at WPI https://pinknoam.com/the-story-behind-studying-game-design-at-wpi/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 16:00:01 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/the-story-behind-studying-game-design-at-wpi/ High school graduates interested in studying game design may wish to pursue an education in the field and gain hands-on experience coding, writing, and programming games. At PAX East in April, I had the pleasure of speaking with some of the students from the Interactive Media and Game Development program at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. I […]]]>

High school graduates interested in studying game design may wish to pursue an education in the field and gain hands-on experience coding, writing, and programming games. At PAX East in April, I had the pleasure of speaking with some of the students from the Interactive Media and Game Development program at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. I wanted to know more, so I reached out to the WPI team to dig deeper into what they do within the game development program.

I was able to speak with two current students, Justin Gaborit and Brendan Horack, as well as WPI’s Director of Interactive Media and Game Development Gillian Smith. They revealed how the university is working to prepare would-be developers and programmers for their potential roles in the games space, and gave me clearer insight into the priorities of people looking to break into this field after graduation. of their degree.

WPI students at work. Image courtesy of WPI website.

Inspiration to study game design can come from anywhere

Justin Gaborit is a student in WPI’s Interactive Media & Game Development program whom I met at PAX East in April. At the show, he presented a game he was working on: Tuber, an endless runner where you dodge obstacles and increase your score as you race through a tubular level with occasional biome changes, taking you from trees and greenery to spiky cacti in the desert. I had a blast playing Tuberand could tell very quickly that Gaborit had an eye for fun, engaging and accessible games.

“I really got into game design when I was younger because I was into role-playing games,” Gaborit said, referring to some of his favorites like Fallout 3 and Thief. “My dream job would be to work on a big role-playing game as a content designer or programmer.”

He has also contributed to other games such as Start of triagea simulation developed in partnership with the Massachusetts Digital Games Institute and the Yale School of Medicine to help train paramedics and other first responders in mass casualty response, as well as Midnight Trialsa roguelike where you fight in a mystical dream world using deck building skills.

Tuber

The other student I spoke with, Brendan Horack, also started on a programming track, but quickly moved into production when he realized his skills were better suited for this program. Horack’s goal is to work on games that resonate with their audience and have a lasting effect on the people who play them.

“My first game console was a Game Boy,” said Horack. “I like marioi think everyone likes mario. We had a Wii when it came out and one of my favorite games was Lego Star Wars. It was so cool to see two psychics that I loved meet. More recently, I’ve found a lot of fun in games like sea ​​of ​​thievesit’s probably my favorite game to play with friends.”

One of his first inspirations to embark on a video game career came from an unlikely but wholesome source: his grandfather.

“My grandfather sometimes cuts out news articles,” Horack said. “He cut an article about a Boston-based company that made gaming software focused on helping kids with ADHD. I thought there was potential for me to do something serious there- inside.”

Horack himself struggled with ADHD throughout his life, and he recognized how helpful games meant to help people with different conditions could be.

Both Horack and Gaborit display impressive talent and drive, with Horack’s LinkedIn profile describing himself as “competition-driven”. Yet even with the talent and resources of Worcester Polytechnic Institute behind them, the concept of impostor syndrome is something that still lingers in their minds.

Mass Digi at WPI
MassDigi has found its new home at WPI. Image courtesy of WPI website.

Does impostor syndrome ever go away?

Each area creates some level of impostor syndrome: the feeling that you’re not qualified to do the job you’re actually doing, you’re just pretending. Anyone can experience it, and a healthy level of fear can help someone strive for continuous improvement in the career they hope to pursue.

“I go through impostor syndrome quite a bit,” said Horack. “At PAX East at the Made In Mass event, I spoke with a lot of great people in production jobs in the industry. I kept thinking, ‘Am I good enough?’ There’s a lot of existential fear when it comes to getting a job.”

On the production side, he doesn’t focus as much on the tangible elements of the games, but rather makes sure projects stay on track and meet deadlines. When asked what he would like to work on, he mentioned his dislike of projects built on the blockchain, but overall his response was simple and poignant.

“I want to work in games. As long as I can find that job and find a community to work with, I want to find a place where I can be happy. That being said, if Rare wants to offer me a job and I can continue to work sea ​​of ​​thievesI will do that.”

Gaborit had similar feelings about the type of work he wants to do and the priorities he has in mind as he nears graduation.

“What I prioritize is, ‘Do I like what I’m doing? And do I know what I’m doing? Am I happy?’ It’s a lot of different things to juggle.” – Justin Gaborit, student at WPI

WPI Staff Gillian Smith and her students
Director of Interactive Media and Game Development at WPI Gillian Smith with students. Image courtesy of WPI website.

Preparing for a career in video game development

As students approach graduation, there is a lot to consider in terms of the type of career they want to pursue, what experiences they would like to have, and who they would like to work with. WPI has resources in place to support students after graduation, in addition to preparing them while in school.

Gillian Smith, director of interactive media and game development at WPI, has worked in higher education for more than a decade and teaches computer science, artificial intelligence, new interfaces and introductory courses for non-professionals. -majors. She uses her experience and the team of teachers she manages to help prepare students for their future careers in the gaming space.

“Our faculty come from a wide variety of backgrounds,” Smith said. “Some have very academic backgrounds and some have basic industry experience – working on game production, writing games. Our career development center is the highest ranked in the country for job placement. career, and we run a number of workshops with our students.”

In April, WPI partnered with Rockstar Games for an Unpacking the Portfolio workshop. Experts helped students determine what kind of criteria to include in their portfolios based on what part of the gaming industry they wanted to enter. The university also hosts guest speakers and sends students to PAX East each year to network and run the booth.

“We showcase student games at our PAX East booth,” Smith said. “We send students out so they can represent WPI and represent themselves. They work in the booth for a few hours and then they’re free to roam the show and network with everyone.”

PAX East 2022 Convention Floor
PAX East 2022

Speaking to Gillian, she explained how the Interactive Media and Game Development program is designed to help students discover which direction they want to go.

“Some students have a very narrow idea of ​​what the industry is like, thinking they’ll be working on games they play at home. We show them all the different types of jobs and the different skills they’ll need “, she said. “Some students graduate in game development and end up working in the tech industry, keeping gaming as a hobby or side job.”

WPI is not the only university to offer a game development program, but it is a leading institution of higher learning with STEM programs that attract applicants from across the country and abroad. With the Class of 2022 just graduating and more and more students entering the workforce every day, it won’t be long before we see the next generation of game developers taking over the future of the games we play. And if the time I’ve spent talking with WPI students and staff is any indication, it’s sure to be a very promising future.


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Apple has revealed the winners of this year’s Game Design Awards https://pinknoam.com/apple-has-revealed-the-winners-of-this-years-game-design-awards/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/apple-has-revealed-the-winners-of-this-years-game-design-awards/ On June 6, Apple held their annual Global Developers Conference, which gave previews of upcoming software such as iOS 16, Watch OS, and iPadOS 16, as well as their new products like the M2 chip containing MacBook Air and Pro. Also on the same day was this year’s Apple Design Awards, which showcased the best […]]]>

On June 6, Apple held their annual Global Developers Conference, which gave previews of upcoming software such as iOS 16, Watch OS, and iPadOS 16, as well as their new products like the M2 chip containing MacBook Air and Pro. Also on the same day was this year’s Apple Design Awards, which showcased the best apps and games in various categories. Apple has selected 12 developers from around the world to create innovative, creative and extremely well-designed games. They also gave users a sense of vision, purpose, and brilliance.

This year, Apple offered six categories, including a game and an app. 36 finalists were chosen and a winner was selected in the categories of inclusiveness, fun and enjoyment, interaction, social, visual and graphic impact, and innovation. Here is a list of the games that won in each category:

Inclusivity – Wylde Flowers

Produced by Studio Drydock, Wylde Flowers is an Apple Arcade Original that features a cast of LGBTQIA+ characters, with a story that represents all ages, cultures and sexualities. It takes place in a magical world that explores themes of identity, acceptance and support. The finalists in this category were Letter Rooms, Navi, Noted. and held.

Pleasure and Pleasure – Overboard!


A murder mystery game that comes with a twist – you are the murderer. The object of the game is not to cross-examine suspects and find evidence pointing to the killer, but to escape it all. Wonderful narrative experience with multiple endings, the same case can be repeated several times without getting exhausted. Oberboard! beat Chineasy, Moncage, Please, Touch The Artwork and Waterllama to get here.

Interaction – A musical story


Beating the harmonies created by Gibbon: Beyond the Trees, Transit, Vectornator: Vector Design and What Remains of Edith Finch, A Musical Story is a rhythm game that adds romantic storytelling in a minimalist way.

Social Impact – Gibbon Beyond the Trees


Another Apple Arcade Original, Gibbon takes players on an ecological adventure in search of a family in hand-drawn landscapes. Although it may look like any other fun game, it has an eco-friendly storyline that will teach everyone an important lesson. Finalists – Active Arcade, Empathy, Headspace and Wylde Flowers.

Visuals and graphics – Lego Star Wars: Castaways


Lego games are known for their cutscenes, visual effects, and stress-free gameplay. Castaways follows the same as it takes place on a long-forgotten planet in a huge galaxy full of secrets, action, and dance parties! Its competitors were Alien: Isolation, Behind the Frame, MD Clock and (Not Boring) Habits.

Innovation – Marvel Future Revolution


An ambitious title, Future Revolution has joined the lineup of superhero games as an open-world RPG offering its users a cutting-edge experience. It already won the iPad Game of the Year award last year for its jaw-dropping cutscenes, incredible combat, and brilliant heroes. Now the title has won yet another accolade in a category that had strong competitors such as Active Arcade, Focus Noodles, Procreate, and Townscaper.

What do you think of this list? If you haven’t tried these games yet, now might be a good time!

Also check out this definitive list of all Apple Arcade games currently available!


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Considering a degree in game design? What you need to know | Best Graduate Schools https://pinknoam.com/considering-a-degree-in-game-design-what-you-need-to-know-best-graduate-schools/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 20:29:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/considering-a-degree-in-game-design-what-you-need-to-know-best-graduate-schools/ About 3 billion people worldwide play digital games, according to industry research, and the field is only growing. This is why pursuing a degree in game design, which combines art and technical work, can potentially open the doors to a long and satisfying career. Jim Huntley, professor and head of marketing for the University of […]]]>

About 3 billion people worldwide play digital games, according to industry research, and the field is only growing.

This is why pursuing a degree in game design, which combines art and technical work, can potentially open the doors to a long and satisfying career.

Jim Huntley, professor and head of marketing for the University of Southern California’s games program, which offers bachelor’s and master’s degree courses, says he enjoys watching people enjoy the games he helped invent. . “You can see their faces light up,” he says.

Digital games can be made and played on many types of electronic devices, including personal computers, mobile devices, and handheld game consoles. This category of games also includes video games that require a TV, game console, and remote control.

Huntley especially appreciates times when a player is happy with an aspect or feature of a game they contributed to that was inspired by a game they admired, he says. “I remember how enthusiastic and excited I was when something similar… happened to me with this other game, and it’s always a pleasure to pass on that enthusiasm.”

However, some game developers warn that the process of producing a game can be frustrating at times and a career in gaming isn’t for everyone.

“Really make sure it’s something you want to do for eight hours a day,” says Miriam Harries, advanced game designer at Schell Games, a Pittsburgh-based game development company.

How to know if a career in game design is a good choice

While it’s possible for anyone to make a good game on their own, game development usually involves a diverse team of people.

“It’s a lot more collaborative than a lot of people expect,” Harries says. “If you’re not a good collaborator, you won’t get very far, and you won’t have fun.”

The field of game design requires a wide range of skills, employing both creative and scientific professionals. For example, some of the roles in game companies include:

  • Artist or animator
  • Sound engineer
  • creative director
  • Database or data manager
  • game designer
  • machine learning engineer
  • game tester
  • Producer
  • Programmer or software developer
  • User experience designer
  • Technical support specialist or manager
  • Translator
  • Writer
  • voice actor

“Working in games is not one career path, but many different career paths,” says Jessica Hammer, acting associate director of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania. “Everything you do in games is going to be deeply interdisciplinary, but you have to be able to work with people who make art even if you’re not an artist. You have to be able to work with programmers even if you’re not a programmer.”

A key indicator that someone is a good candidate for a game design program is if they’ve created a game in the past or have developed a detailed vision for a game, Huntley says. “These are the candidates that stand out for us because we can tell from the time they’ve invested to that point that they’re serious.”

The Value of a Game Design Degree

Formal training in game design isn’t necessary to enter the gaming industry, experts say, noting that the best reason to pursue a game-related degree is to learn from skilled game developers and hone your skills. creative or scientific skills that are valuable in industry.

“The most important thing you’re going to walk away with isn’t your degree, it’s your wallet,” says Hammer, who conducts research on transformational games designed to influence a person’s thoughts, feelings or behaviors. “Our programs are a way for you to build a compelling, high-quality portfolio with a ton of expert support in all areas of gaming.”

Some game design schools focus on multiple aspects of game design and offer general degrees, while others focus on a particular aspect of game development, such as game animation. According to experts, one of the main ways to judge the quality of a game design program is to see if the program’s alumni have a high placement rate in the gaming industry.

Here are the top five undergraduate game design programs, according to U.S. News ranking of those programs. This ranking is based on the number of nominations received from academic institutions that responded to a US News survey.

Job Outlook for Game Developers

Aspiring game designers rarely appreciate the sheer size of the gaming industry and the number of job options it offers, says Huntley. In fact, the international game industry is larger and generates more revenue than the global film industry.

“There’s a misperception that games are kind of a fad,” Huntley says.

But the gaming industry is growing rapidly.

A study released by market research and analytics firm Newzoo in May 2022 predicted that global revenue generated by gaming companies would top $200 billion in 2022. In contrast, global film industry revenue has reached $100 billion for the first time in 2019, the Film Association reported.

The median annual salary for US video game designers was $79,890 in 2021, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, which projects employment in the field in 2030 will be 10-15% higher than what it was in 2020.

While a career creating digital games is a dream come true for many, would-be game developers shouldn’t be so impressed that they forget to inquire about working conditions when choosing employers, say the experts.

“One of the things you want to be careful about is making sure you have standards for yourself about how you’re willing to be treated in a job,” Hammer says.

According to Harries, the best part of the game development field is being surrounded by fascinating colleagues. “I work with some really great, creative people, and it’s super fun,” she says.


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Houston Summer Camps 2022 – Minecraft Coding and Game Design at KidzToPros https://pinknoam.com/houston-summer-camps-2022-minecraft-coding-and-game-design-at-kidztopros/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 12:17:08 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/houston-summer-camps-2022-minecraft-coding-and-game-design-at-kidztopros/ Houston Summer Camps 2022 – Minecraft Coding and Game Design on KidzToPros Adventure Maps (Ages 7-11) Design your own adventures and games that you can share with your friends in Minecraft Coding & Game Design: Adventure Maps! Children will think about how to create a playable activity and learn about conditionals and triggering events. They […]]]>

Houston Summer Camps 2022 – Minecraft Coding and Game Design on KidzToPros Adventure Maps (Ages 7-11)

Design your own adventures and games that you can share with your friends in Minecraft Coding & Game Design: Adventure Maps! Children will think about how to create a playable activity and learn about conditionals and triggering events. They will use command blocks, red stones and more to create adventure maps, missions or games. They will also be able to package their game to send to anyone else to play! Kids will grow in problem solving and computational thinking as they play one of the most popular and dynamic games in history.

Benefits of this program

KidzToPros combines the latest STEM technology with arts and sports to keep kids challenged, inspired and moving. Challenging and fun STEM, arts, and sports programs produce well-rounded students. We constantly hear from parents how important this is to them. They want their children to participate in top-notch enrichment activities that provide a solid foundation and lead to lifelong learning.


Stay up to date with all the fun events and activities in Houston with our weekly updates on things to do in Houston this week, things to do in Houston this weekend, things to do in Houston with kids this weekend weekend and things to do in Galveston this weekend

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2D and 3D games (11-18 years old) https://pinknoam.com/2d-and-3d-games-11-18-years-old/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:14:49 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/2d-and-3d-games-11-18-years-old/ Unity Game Design: 2D and 3D games (11-18 years old) Students will learn and practice the basics of Unity Game Design using the C# scripting language. They will learn player movement with vectors and simple physics, and move on to integrating game objects and assets. Students will need to think about game level design and […]]]>

Unity Game Design: 2D and 3D games (11-18 years old)

Students will learn and practice the basics of Unity Game Design using the C# scripting language. They will learn player movement with vectors and simple physics, and move on to integrating game objects and assets. Students will need to think about game level design and the bells and whistles of first creation of a Complete 2D Game In week 2, students will create a customizable first-person game that will require them to master controlling 3D characters and controlling 3D models and animations. They will use particle systems to create explosions and effects, and implement AI for computerized opponents.

Benefits of this program

KidzToPros combines the latest STEM technology with arts and sports to keep kids challenged, inspired and moving. Challenging and fun STEM, arts and sports programs produce well-rounded students. We constantly hear parents say how important this is to them. They want their children to participate in top-notch enrichment activities that provide a solid foundation and lead to lifelong learning.


Stay up to date with all the fun events and activities in Houston with our weekly updates on things to do in Houston this week, things to do in Houston this weekend, things to do in Houston with kids this weekend weekend and things to do in Galveston this weekend

And to get these updates straight to your feed, follow us on Facebook by clicking the … icon next to the search lens icon


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How a video game design competition opened up friendships and opportunities for UK students – Kentucky Kernel https://pinknoam.com/how-a-video-game-design-competition-opened-up-friendships-and-opportunities-for-uk-students-kentucky-kernel/ Tue, 31 May 2022 17:56:36 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/how-a-video-game-design-competition-opened-up-friendships-and-opportunities-for-uk-students-kentucky-kernel/ They met as strangers with a passion for designing video games and left as friends. Rafael Estrada, Sam Morris, Michael Probst and Caleb Geyer met at the Global Game Jam Event in Lexington in late January. Probst and Geyer are both current British students, Morris a British graduate, and Estrada a game developer from California. […]]]>

They met as strangers with a passion for designing video games and left as friends.

Rafael Estrada, Sam Morris, Michael Probst and Caleb Geyer met at the Global Game Jam Event in Lexington in late January.

Probst and Geyer are both current British students, Morris a British graduate, and Estrada a game developer from California. Everyone came from different backgrounds. Yet this game jam on the Newtown campus of Bluegrass Community & Technical College brought together these people, who may have never met, to work on a project.

The Global Game Jam is an event where participants from all over the world create a game within 48 hours from a given keyword. Many well-known games like Surgeon Simulator, Super Hot, and Reflections at Sunset originated from various game jams.

But more than that, a game jam is an event that brings people together, helps strangers connect with each other, and empowers everyone to bring their passions to life in a video game.

These events are attended by various people who may have 20 years of experience in game development or have never played a video game before. Either way, everyone is welcome to participate.

RunJumpDev, a Lexington, Kentucky-based nonprofit whose goal is to cultivate the local game development community, hosted a branch of the Global Game jam at BCTC over a weekend in early February.

Fourteen participants, at 6 p.m. Friday, were given the keyword “Repair” and 30 minutes to brainstorm ideas.

After this period, anyone with an idea had the floor to present their ideas. These ranged from a NASCAR-inspired pit stop management game to a “Metroidvania-like” game (a genre of games inspired by Metroid and Castlevania games) where players collect parts to repair a robot.

Anyone who enjoyed a pitch was welcome to come together with whoever pitched it and form a team. Five teams were created, some participants worked solo while others worked with up to 4 people.

Estrada, 31, is a game developer from California. Estrada is currently working on a game for Xbox called Unichrome.

Morris, 29, is a British graduate majoring in computer engineering and physics. His closest experience to game development was working in firmware development at Lexmark.

Probst, 22, is a British senior specializing in computer engineering. He is co-founder of FricknFrack Games, a game developer in Lexington whose goal is to create fun games with purpose.

“We want to give players a great experience that’s not just fun, but gives them something meaningful. It can be anything from a simulation game where, you know, you learn a new skill …or you know, just basic education, teaching, that sort of thing.

Geyer, 21, is also a British senior, specializing in IT. He is a student at the Science and Engineering Library on the UK campus, who creates small games in his spare time as a hobby.

Regardless of experience, the game jam brought these four together for 48 hours to bring their imaginations to life.

The game that these four aimed to create was called Singularity. The initial pitch was to make a competitive game where one player destroys things and the other player repairs the destruction.

Each task a player completed earned them points to achieve a high score, just like an old arcade game would.

When they came together, each member had an idea of ​​what they wanted the game to be. They have been separated from a first person experience, a 2D game or even a game using pixel art.

By the end of the first day, their ideas had completely changed.

By 10 p.m., after three hours of discussion, the team had reached a consensus on what their game would be.

Singularity would be themed around robots versus humans, with asymmetrical gameplay.

A team would be the human destroyer. A player would be in a first-person environment, tearing through a variety of objects and scenery according to an on-screen task list.

The other team would be the robot repairers. Three players would play with a third-person bird’s-eye view of the game, going through an assortment of mini-games to repair items that the first human destroyed.

After the brainstorming came the distribution of roles.

“Making video games involves working with so many different art forms. There’s the visuals, the art. There’s the music, the programming, the sound effects, the story,” Estrada said. .

“Being allowed to work in a team allows you to break things up and focus on one thing at a time,” Estrada added.

Estrada handled the object and environment modeling himself, while Morris worked on creating the minigames and some aspects of the level design.

Probst and Geyer worked on smaller tasks. Probst worked on keyboard and controller compatibility with their game, while Geyer edited the movement and rotation of objects and players.

Once their tasks were determined, the following days were spent writing more than a thousand lines of code, finding bugs and fixing problems.

Midway through Saturday, the tension seemed to mount as the hours ticked toward their deadline, and each of them typed furiously at their keyboards.

That doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be fun.

“If I’m making a game, I’m having fun,” Probst said.

As they got to work and fell asleep comfortably in their roles, the crew started talking about their work, laughing and having fun.

Estrada, being more experienced in this area of ​​work, offered advice to the other three members, teaching them how to code in the software they were using.

“Being able to work with people who had never used Unity before or had never made a game before and be able to show ‘OK yeah, I really know how to do particle effects…’ and be able to explain that in a way that hopefully you’ll be able to use later. I thought that was cool,” Estrada said.

Sunday as the deadline approaches, the silence of the day before is absent. Team members are constantly discussing problems, solutions, and new ideas that are still being explored.

The lines between the teams are slowly blurring and participants start yelling at each other for advice from other teams in case of last-minute problems. Controller issues, hit detection not working, pieces of programs disappearing.

As all these problems arise, everyone in the room tries to come together to help each other. For an hour, the whole room is a shared community working together on a single project, instead of five teams working alone.

“What I liked least was the last few hours, realizing that we might not be able to get everything we wanted,” Geyer said.

At 6 p.m. Sunday, the team submitted their play, although neither member really wanted it.

In 48 hours, getting rid of every bug was nearly impossible. Sometimes characters would fall through the ground or animations would not work properly.

“Of course, I’m proud of what we’ve done. But I wish there were more,” Probst said.

Although the event has ended, Singularity’s development is not yet complete.

The team has reached an agreement to go to weekly RunJumpDev meetings together and plan to work on Singularity over time, to be a truly finished game at a later date.

And while Singularity may not become a hit game on an official platform like Steam or Xbox, it will certainly unite these four for a long time.


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Acmetonia Elementary student tackles inclusion and is named a finalist in a video game design competition https://pinknoam.com/acmetonia-elementary-student-tackles-inclusion-and-is-named-a-finalist-in-a-video-game-design-competition/ Sun, 29 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/acmetonia-elementary-student-tackles-inclusion-and-is-named-a-finalist-in-a-video-game-design-competition/ A student from Acmetonia Elementary is a finalist in a video game design challenge for a game he coded to raise awareness about accessibility in games. Video games were never a big part of Owen Gamble’s life until the pandemic hit. The 12-year-old would hop on his computer for a gaming session with friends on […]]]>

A student from Acmetonia Elementary is a finalist in a video game design challenge for a game he coded to raise awareness about accessibility in games.

Video games were never a big part of Owen Gamble’s life until the pandemic hit.

The 12-year-old would hop on his computer for a gaming session with friends on games like Roblox to socialize with them.

But he ran into a problem – most of the games his friends would recommend playing weren’t accessible to Owen.

“The main thing that was difficult was that most games I had to use my right hand,” he said. “My right hand is not as fast, so the others can react faster.”

After having a stroke in the womb, Owen was diagnosed with right hemiplegia when he was 10 months old. The disability results from brain and/or spinal cord damage, resulting in paralysis on the right side of the body.

The disability limits his mobility to follow the rapid movements required with both sides of the body in games.

His mother, Stacie, said her son had to do everything possible to modify the games to make them work for him to play.

“The gaming world isn’t as inclusive as you think it is,” she said. “With everyone moving online, it was a wake-up call for games that weren’t inclusive.”

Noticing the lack of inclusion in games, Owen had an idea. He said he wanted to code a game showing the reality he faces when trying to play right-handed dominated games. He created the “undestined” game through a computer game program called Scratch. He said the game is played from the perspective of a person whose dominant hand is the left hand.

Sue Mellon, a gifted support and enrichment teacher for the Allegheny Valley School District, said the game’s creation was part of the national Games for Change Student Challenge. Middle and high school students (grades 5 through 12) submitted original social impact games for a chance to win prizes, including a $10,000 scholarship, she said.

“I’m always looking for different programs for kids, and I knew kids loved games,” Mellon said.

The students were able to base their games around three themes of social impact: “Shaping the world for difference”, “Sustainable cities” or “The voice of a new generation”.

Owen’s play earned him a finalist in the “Shaping the World for Difference” category.

“I’m so excited for him. He’s such a nice boy,” Mellon said.

Owen said he didn’t think he would get far in the competition.

” It feels good. I didn’t 100% think I would go this far,” he said. “I just did it for fun.”

His mother credits Mellon for giving her son the opportunity to experience competition. She enjoyed seeing her progress throughout the project.

“It was nice to see his hard work pay off,” she said. “It was the first time he had sparked this kind of interest and seen his idea come to life on screen.”

Owen will find out his place in the competition on June 16.

Tanisha Thomas is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Tanisha at 412-480-7306, tthomas@triblive.com or via Twitter .



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RO Game Design Platform Machinations.io Raises $3.3M in Series A Round https://pinknoam.com/ro-game-design-platform-machinations-io-raises-3-3m-in-series-a-round/ Thu, 26 May 2022 11:01:31 +0000 https://pinknoam.com/ro-game-design-platform-machinations-io-raises-3-3m-in-series-a-round/ Machinations.io, a Romanian web-based platform for designing and predicting game savings, raised $3.3 million in a Series A round. The round was led by Hiro Capital, a European venture capital firm focused on the gaming industry, and follow-on investments by Acequia Capital, Venrex Investment Management and GapMinder. The amount will be invested to expand its […]]]>

Machinations.io, a Romanian web-based platform for designing and predicting game savings, raised $3.3 million in a Series A round.

The round was led by Hiro Capital, a European venture capital firm focused on the gaming industry, and follow-on investments by Acequia Capital, Venrex Investment Management and GapMinder.

The amount will be invested to expand its team and launch new features and services to support the rapid development of the number of users.

Founded in 2018, Machinations.io is the first and only browser-based platform for designing and predicting game economies and systems for premium, free-to-play, and prize-winning games.

The startup was launched by Mihai Gheza, Dana Gheza, Radu Crăciun, Alin Moldovan and Joris Dormans, professor at Leiden University Center for the Arts in Society in the Netherlands. Machinations was born from a doctoral research at the University of Amsterdam in 2012 by Joris Dormans (co-founder).

The startup has attracted around $5 million in investment so far. Prior to this Series A round, Machinations.io raised $1.6 million in funding from Seedcamp, GapMinder, Acequia Capital, and several top angel investors.

The platform is currently used by over 35,000 game design professionals and 400 academic institutions worldwide.

“We are honored to be backed by such reputable VCs and to have their confidence in our vision and role within the gaming industry and beyond. We are growing our team and rolling out integrations with vendors in-game telemetry and the most popular Web3 marketplaces, pushing towards our goal of becoming the standard for in-game economy modeling, forecasting and optimization,” said Mihai Gheza, co-founder and CEO of Machinations .io.

“The Machinations.io team has forged a set of tools that will be fundamental in the future of game design, both centralized games and Web3. -simple, efficient, purpose-built web form delivering in-game savings in a streamlined, browser-based solution is revolutionary,” said Spike Laurie, Partner at Hiro Capital.

“We first invested in Machinations.io in 2020, in a round we led. We continue to support the founders because of the uniqueness of the product they created. This product completely changes the way games are made and designed and implicitly how the biggest entertainment industry grows,” said GapMinder Partner Cosmin Ochișor.

(Photo: Artur Szczybylo/Dreamstime)

simona@romania-insider.com


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